First Study of Its Kind Detects 44 Hazardous Air Pollutants at Gas Drilling Sites

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/solveclimate/blog/~3/O0ufMVKqmvU/natural-gas-drilling-air-pollution-fracking-colorado-methane-benzene-endocrine-health-NMHC-epa-toxic-chemicals-

With gas wells in some states being drilled near schools and homes, scientists see a need for better chemical disclosure laws and follow-up research.       
       

   
           
                    By Lisa Song
       
       

For years, the controversy over natural gas drilling has focused on the water and air quality problems linked to hydraulic fracturing, the process where chemicals are blasted deep underground to release tightly bound natural gas deposits.
But a new study reports that a set of chemicals called non-methane hydrocarbons, or NMHCs, is found in the air near drilling sites even when fracking isn't in progress.
According to a peer-reviewed study in the journal Human and Ecological Risk Assessment, more than 50 NMHCs were found near gas wells in rural Colorado, including 35 that affect the brain and nervous system. Some were detected at levels high enough to potentially harm children who are exposed to them before birth.
The authors say the source of the chemicals is likely a mix of the raw gas that is vented from the wells and emissions from industrial equipment used during the gas production process.
The paper cites two other recent studies on NMHCs near gas drilling sites in Colorado. But the new study was conducted over a longer period of time and tested for more chemicals than those studies did.
"To our knowledge, no study of this kind has been published to date," the authors wrote.

      See Also: 
   
           
                    Tiny Doses of Gas Drilling Chemicals May Have Big Health Effects       
             
                    Feds Punt on Leadership Over Fracking Rules, Experts Say       
             
                    Gas Industry Aims to Block 2030 Zero-Carbon Building Goal       
       

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